Raw data as oxymoron

“Raw data is both an oxymoron and a bad idea; to the contrary, data should be cooked with care.”Geoffrey Bowker
Bowker was spot on in his comments made last week at Columbia Journalism School. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to make order out of chaos from “raw data,” i.e. unintelligible, inaccurate spreadsheets.

Using data-viz to make a wire story stand out from the pack

I’ve been interested lately in finding examples of online-only, collaborative, non-profit newsrooms who’ve utilized the power of data visualization techniques to give added value to stories that otherwise wouldn’t necessarily be unique, and in doing so beat out legacy news organizations who published a text narrative alone. Take, for example, this data-rich story and interactive map displaying statewide testing results published by NJSpotlight Friday. While the news that only 8 out of 10 graduating seniors had passed New Jersey’s current standardized test in 2011 was widely reported across the state last week, including by the Star-Ledger in Newark and by The Press of Atlantic City, only NJSpotlight took advantage of the story’s strong data element to produce a more concise, data-driven visual narrative.
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Overlaying a bubble chart onto a Google map

Others may hate, but I’m a big fan of using bubbles to display data. When implemented correctly (i.e. scaled in terms of area instead of diameter), bubbles can be an aesthetically appealing and concise way to represent the value of data points in an inherently visual format. Bubbles are even more useful when they include interactivity, with events like mouseover and zoom allowing users to drill down and compare similar-sized bubbles more easily than they can in static graphics. So, when I was recently working on a class project on autism diagnoses in New York City, I decided to use bubbles to represent the percentage of students with individualized education plans at all 1250 or so K-8 New York City schools. Continue reading