Overlaying a bubble chart onto a Google map

Others may hate, but I’m a big fan of using bubbles to display data. When implemented correctly (i.e. scaled in terms of area instead of diameter), bubbles can be an aesthetically appealing and concise way to represent the value of data points in an inherently visual format. Bubbles are even more useful when they include interactivity, with events like mouseover and zoom allowing users to drill down and compare similar-sized bubbles more easily than they can in static graphics. So, when I was recently working on a class project on autism diagnoses in New York City, I decided to use bubbles to represent the percentage of students with individualized education plans at all 1250 or so K-8 New York City schools. Continue reading