Critique: Michigan GOP Primary Visualization, via HuffPo



For a lot of self-indulgent reasons, I secretly love The Huffington Post. But well-designed visualizations and interactive interfaces have never been the news organization’s strong suit. While their live coverage of Tuesday night’s GOP primary in Michigan had all the flavor of a classic HuffPo report – updates faster than you can send a Tweet, snarky comments, and dramatic headlines – what stood out to me was how they integrated real-time election results into a mapping format. And not only was the map visually appealing, with clean lines, distinctive color choices and a refreshing sense of minimalism, but it also did a good job of allowing the user to know what was going on across the state as the results were being tallied. The legend makes it clear which candidates are leading using numbers, while the map allows viewers to see which part of the state Santorum and Romney have claimed.

Having this geographic breakdown is particularly important in Michigan. For one, the notorious swing-state is vastly different demographically from one area to another. People in unionized Detroit vote nothing like the more conservative folks on the Michigan panhandle. Moreover, knowing who received what votes where is even more important in Michigan because of the fact that it’s Romney’s home state. If Romney didn’t come off with big margins in and around his hometown south of Detroit, it would have seriously hurt his momentum going forward. The importance of the Michigan vote to Romney becomes even more important in light of his recent insistence that the auto-companies should not have received a bailout and that the country “should let Detriot go broke.” But it doesn’t seem as though Romney’s comments lost him the urban areas entirely, as he easily carried Detroit and Grand Rapids by huge margins.

1 Comment Critique: Michigan GOP Primary Visualization, via HuffPo

  1. SEM

    This is a nice example – and perhaps a step up for the HuffPo – but I think it would have been nice to see the margin reflected in the map colors, and maybe a chart of the percentages instead of just a table.

    Reply

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